Hamburg – Stumbling Stones

I’ve seen projects such as this in other cities in Germany, but Hamburg is the only location where this receives finance and support from the city council. The aim of the project is to mark the location of where people lived or worked until they were deported or killed by the Nazis during the Second World War.

There’s a marvellous web-site behind this project at http://www.stolpersteine-hamburg.de/ which gives details of each of the plaques. I was surprised when I saw just how many of these plaques there are around Hamburg, it’s now in excess of 5,000 and what a wonderful project this is to remember and commemorate those who died.

The plaques above are located on Bartelsstraße, although I saw tens of the plaques walking around the city today. The names on the plaques above are:

Mathel Rosenbaum who lived at Bartelsstraße 76, deported in 1941 to Riga and murdered.

Max Rosenbaum who lived at Bartelsstraße 76, born in 1882, deported in 1941 to Lodz and murdered on 28 March 1942.

Edith Rosenbaum who lived at Bartelsstraße 76, born in 1899, deported in 1941 to Riga and murdered.

Hermann Hauptmann who lived at Bartelsstraße 76, born in 1919, deported in 1941 to Minsk and then Majdanek concentration camp. He survived the war and in 1949 he emigrated to the United States of America. This information seems to have come to light after the plaque was laid (http://www.stolpersteine-hamburg.de/index.php?MAIN_ID=7&BIO_ID=4994).

Mathel Hauptmann who lived at Bartelsstraße 76, born in 1922, deported on 11 July 1942 to Auschwitz and murdered.

These plaques are located further down the same street, at Bartelsstraße 76.